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Question 1 of 30
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A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

With "A Vindication of the Rights of Woman", Mary Wollstonecraft, an English author, introduced the world to one of the most significant works of the early feminist movement. She is credited with laying down the foundation for the women's rights movement with this historic pamphlet.
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Pride and Prejudice

"Pride and Prejudice", published in three volumes in the year 1813, is one of Jane Austen's most popular works. In fact, she called this work "her own darling child." This novel follows the life of "Elizabeth Bennet", an intelligent and witty female protagonist whose changing relationship with the proud "Mr Darcy" makes it a delightful read.
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Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Harriet Beecher Stowe was a popular author and an American abolitionist, and her most famous work "Uncle Tom's Cabin" or "Life Among the Lowly" reflects her anti-slavery beliefs. This novel, published in the year 1852, went on to have a profound effect on the general attitude towards African-Americans and slavery in the U.S.
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Frankenstein

Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" or "The Modern Prometheus" is one of the most popular gothic novels of all time. The novel was the culmination of a challenge posed by Lord Byron that Shelley and her friends had to write their own ghost stories. Shelley's "Frankenstein" is based on her dreams and two years after the challenge, i.e., in 1818, the book was published.
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The Age of Innocence

With "The Age of Innocence", Edith Wharton became the first woman to be awarded the Pultizer Prize. The novel became so popular that it inspired many films, television and theatrical adaptions. In this novel, which was published in the year 1920, she makes an ironic commentary on the many cruelties and hypocrisies of the Manhattan society in the years before, during, and after the Great War.
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Murder on the Orient Express

"Murder on the Orient Express" was published in 1934 and is one of Agatha Christies most famous murder mysteries with the iconic Hercule Poirot as the protagonist. The book was adapted for the big screen in 1974 and was directed by Sidney Lumet and featured Albert Finney as Hercule Poirot.
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To Kill A Mockingbird

Harper Lee won the 1961 Pulitzer Prize of her most famous work "To Kill A Mockingbird" which was published in 1960. Her novel explores the devastating effects of racism in the 1930s and the problems posed by the "Great Depression". Though this novel talks about serious issues, the warmth and humor depicted in the novel leave a lasting impression on the readers.
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A Room of One’s Own

Virginia Woolf is one of the most important modernist authors of the 20th century. In fact, she was also a pioneer in the use of stream of consciousness as a narrative device. "A Room of One's Own" is an extended essay which was first published in 1929. In this essay, she advances the thesis that " a woman must have money and a room of her own if she is to write fiction."
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Jane Eyre

"Jane Eyre" was written by Charlotte Brontë under the pen name "Currer Bell" and was published in 1847. Brontë says that with Jane Eyre, she created "a heroine as plain, and as small as myself." Modern-day critics read this novel as a plea for gender equa
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The Handmaid’s Tale

Margaret Atwood's "The Handmaid's Tale" was published in 1985 and is one of the most popular dystopian novels of all time. The novel follows the life of "Offred", a handmaid in the Republic of Gilead. The novel brings alive the horrors of theocratic dictatorship, and the most important theme is the presence and manipulation of power.
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Wuthering Heights

Emily Brontë's "Wuthering Heights" was published under the pseudonym "Ellis Bell" in 1847. Over the years, readers have agreed that this novel is perhaps the most haunting and tormented love story ever written. This novel exists as a work of tremendous an
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Middlemarch

Mary Ann Evans wrote "Middlemarch" which was published in eight installments in 1871-1872, under the pseudonym "George Eliot." This novel is considered to be one of the greatest English novels of all time. The novel's subtitle— "A Study of Provincial Life
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The Awakening

Kate Chopin is considered to be one of the earliest feminist writers in American literature. In her novel "The Awakening", published in 1899, Chopin creates a controversial feminist lead with "Edna Pontellier" and the story revolves around her transformation from a traditional housewife and mother to an individual who develops a sense of self-awareness and independence beyond her family.
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The Second Sex

Simone de Beauvoir was a leading French existentialist philosopher, writer, an intellectual, feminist, and social theorist who had contributed immensely to both feminist existentialism and feminist theory. Her universally applauded work "The Second Sex" discusses the treatment of women throughout history.
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My Life on the Road

In "My Life on the Road", Gloria Steinem—writer, organizer, activist, and one of the most inspiring people in the world—tells her own story. In this work, she gives a candid account of the early years of her life and how it inspired her to perceive the wo
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Runaway

"Runaway" by Alice Munro is an acclaimed book of extraordinary stories about love and its various betrayals and surprises. Munro writes about women of all ages and circumstances, and she even writes about their friends, lovers, parents, and children, and these characters are vividly etched in our memories.
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The Namesake

"The Namesake" is Jhumpa Lahiri's first novel where she explores Indian diaspora and alienation. The story has emotional and cultural themes which people settled in foreign countries can relate to. She aptly demonstrates the familiar struggles between the old and the new, of assimilation and cultural preservation.
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Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone

J.K.Rowling became one of the most influential authors in the world with the release of "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone", and the next 6 books of the series continued her winning streak. The book became popular with people of all ages and all the 7 books were adapted to the silver screen.
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The Female Eunuch

"The Female Eunuch" was written by Germaine Greer which was published in 1970. This book became an international bestseller and carved a niche for itself as a vital text in the feminist movement. According to Greer's thesis, women in the suburban, consumerist, and nuclear families are repressed sexually which devitalizes them.
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The Fountainhead

Ayn Rand's "The Fountainhead" which was published in 1943, pioneered objectivism in literature. This novel has been hailed as a masterpiece owing to its integrating theme, plot, and powerful characterization. The novel derives its core ideas from the horrors of collectivism which Ayn Rand witnessed firsthand in Europe.
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Fire on the Mountain

"Fire of the Mountain" was written by Anita Desai and was published in 1977. The novel explores the destruction of a woman's world which is bought about by alienation and disintegration, and this ultimately leads to her death. In some ways, the novel is an extension of Desai's memories added on with fiction and reflection.
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The God of Small Things

"The God Small Things" which was published in 1997 was Arundathi Roy's debut novel. She aims to bring out the inequalities that are prevalent in the Indian caste system through her protagonist "Velutha." Despite being a skilled person, Velutha is treated as inferior as he was born into the lower strata of society.
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Fun Home

Alison Bechdel's "Fun Home" was published in 2006. It is a graphic memoir which chronicles her childhood and youth in rural Pennsylvania. "Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic" explores the cartoonist's complex relationship with her late father.
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Whispers of the Desert

"Whispers of the Desert" is a collection of forty-five poems by Fatima Bhutto which was published in 1998. She was fifteen when she wrote "Whispers of the Desert" and even though these were written before the assassination of her mother, Murtaza Bhutto, these poems speak of a life of loneliness and separation.
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Them

"Them" by Joyce Carol Oates is the third installment in the "Wonderland Quartet." She won the U.S. National Book Award for Fiction in 1970 for this novel. In this novel, she depicts an urban world that is vicious to love and prone to random violence.
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The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas

"The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas" was written by Gertrude Stein in 1933 in the form of an autobiography authored by Alice B. Toklas, who was her lover. This work gives a great insight into the art scene in Paris since the couple was friends with prominent French artists like Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso.
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The Dialectic of Sex

With "The Dialectic of Sex", Shulamith Firestone wrote a classic feminist text. In this work, she presents her argument that the "sexual class system" and the different forms of oppression run deep. To eradicate sexism, there has to be a radical reordering of society.
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The Feminine Mystique

Betty Friedan's "The Feminine Mystique" is credited with bringing in the second wave of feminism in the country. With this work, Friedan challenges the "feminine mystique" which is a false notion that a woman's role in the society is restricted to being a wife, mother, a housewife; she cannot be anything else.
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Heidi

Johanna Spyri wrote "Heidi" as a book for children and those who love children. This children's' classic is about a young orphan girl, Heidi, who is sent to live with her grumpy grandfather in the Swiss Alps. This story has charmed and intrigued readers since it was originally published in 1880.
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Five on a Treasure Island

"Five on a Treasure Island" by Enid Blyton is the first of the many Famous Five books written by the English author. The novels are meant for children and feature the adventures of a group of young children—Julian, Dick, Anne, and George (Georgina)— and t

Guess these women writers by their work

The literary world was once dominated by men. Women writers, though, as good as their male counterparts, didn't receive the critical acclaim they deserved. However, women found their way into literature; some wrote under male pseudonyms while others attained recognition posthumously. But, these trailblazing women writers carved a niche for themselves in the literary world with their astounding works and are considered to be the harbingers of feminism. If you love reading and these powerful women writers were on your reading list at some point in time, take this quiz and find out if you can identify the authors of these excellent pieces of literature.

Guess these women writers by their work
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Guess these women writers by their work
18th Oct, 2019
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