These Kitchen Tools Can Totally Help you Bring Your A-Game
26th June, 2020
Netflix unsplash.com
Cooking wouldn’t be half as challenging an experience if every cook knew about these 19 handy kitchen tools, which bring down both their time and effort. Knowing the field is the hallmark of a pro. For instance, athletes are well-versed in every detail of the pitch, which section suits them and which area doesn’t really fit their expertise. Great cooks and chefs are similarly masters of the kitchen and are aware of all sorts of tools and techniques that bring class to their work. Today, we’ve listed 19 such fascinating but lesser-known culinary tools that are incredibly important for a cook for different reasons. Supplement your kitchen with some of these and transcend to the next dimension in your culinary journey!
Mezzaluna foodal.com
01
Mezzaluna
Meaning “half-moon” in Italian, mezzalunas are curved knives that are used with both hands. This reduces the force needed while chopping, making them especially useful for cutting herbs. Another advantage of using these knives is that they very rarely ricochet off the chopping board, thereby reducing the risk of cuts. Mezzalunas are used extensively in restaurants as they’re quick and efficient to work with.
Bundt pan www.williams-sonoma.com
02
Bundt pan
David and Dotty Dalquist, the founders of The Nordic Ware Co., were responsible for bringing the bundt pan to America. Named after the German word "bund" which means "alliance," the pan is now found in two out of every three households in the country. The pan bakes cakes unlike any other and has a hole in the center, which ensures even baking throughout.
Roller docker www.thehomepizzeria.com
03
Roller docker
Baking is not the same without a roller docker by your side! The utensil, which looks very much like a smaller version of a spiked plow, is widely used by professional bakers to pierce deep into the dough and prevent it from blistering. They come in different sizes and varieties and can even be used on pizza dough as well.
Muddler www.barproducts.com
04
Muddler
If you're into making your own cocktails, having a muddler makes sense. It's a long, skinny tool used by bartenders to grind ingredients such as fruits, sugar, and bitters. The base of muddlers is irregular, which allows for proper pounding and eventually delivers the brilliant taste to cocktails. They're either made from wood, plastic, or stainless steel and are extremely durable and long-lasting.
Spiralizers www.epicurious.com
05
Spiralizers
Out of pasta? Look no further! Spiralizers provide exceptional and healthy alternatives to noodles, where vegetables are sliced in a spiral shape that closely resembles pasta. These have multiple blades in them, each of which imparts a different shape to the veggie. Cooking spiralizer-treated vegetables is much easier and quicker compared to traditional pasta, while it's also a favorite among kids.
Pie bird www.atlasobscura.com
06
Pie bird
Used for centuries, the pie bird is a cute little ceramic device that is inserted in the middle of a pie well before baking. The main idea is to provide venting for the pie while it cooks, and is also a means of removing any juice that accumulates during cooking. Sometimes they’re also used for decoration purposes and are available in different shapes.
Wok www.forbes.com
07
Wok
One of the more obvious tools on the list, woks have been traditionally utilized in Chinese cooking for over 2,000 years. These are cooking pots that have a round bottom and huge handles. Carbon steel and cast iron are the most common materials used in them. Although woks are extensively used for cooking stir-frys and noodles, they're decent enough to make sauces and soups as well.
Mandoline www.goodhousekeeping.com
08
Mandoline
When you're looking for precise cuts without eating too much time, a mandoline is your best bet! The slicer produces uniform cuts that are hard to achieve even with the sharpest of knives. Named after the wrist movement of a mandolin (a musical instrument) player, these slicers have two parallel surfaces that are mostly made of stainless steel. Mandolines come in different designs, with some more user-friendly than others.
Zester www.alibaba.com
09
Zester
This tool's main aim is to remove the outer strands and bits from citrus fruits such as lemons and oranges. Zesters have a smaller handle and a longer blade, whose sharpness can be varied depending on the material used. Peeling off the outer layer by a knife requires precision and time, with zesters achieving the objective within minutes. These can, alternatively, also be utilized for shaving chocolate bits for desserts.
Cleaver foodal.com
10
Cleaver
In use since ages, cleavers are heavy knives that come with a long, broad blade. They are mostly used as butcher knives to pierce through the bone and are, therefore, made from iron or carbon steel. Cleavers are also highly versatile and can also be used to chop vegetables and tenderize meat, among other things. They feature heavily in Chinese cooking.
Chinois www.eater.com
11
Chinois
Just as intricate as its name, a chinois is a conical-shaped utensil that is primarily used to deliver an almost microscopic mesh. It is, however, incredibly versatile and works in several ways. It can be used to extract liquids from meat and vegetables, remove the skin from pureed fruits, blend soups in a puree, and ensure that stocks are clear by straining bones and vegetables.
Spurtle james-williams.us
12
Spurtle
Still a big part of Scottish culinary, spurtles have been used since the 15th century and are quite popular in our country too. The utensil is made of wood and now comes in three types: the original Scottish version, a rod-shaped one, and the American design. Spurtles effectively stir porridge and soup, as their design negates the drag effect common in soups.
Skillet www.tasteofhome.com
13
Skillet
Also called a frying pan, skillets have slanted sides and a flat base. The most commonly used pans out there, skillets carry a range of advantages over some of the other pans. Despite offering a lesser surface area, skillets allow cooks great control and access to their dishes. They've been used since the Mesopotamian civilization and are usually made of stainless steel or aluminum.
Mortar and pestle www.epicurious.com
14
Mortar and pestle
This utensil has two parts: mortar, the bowl in which ingredients are put, while pestle is the stick used to pound on the ingredients. Despite the emergence of mixer grinders, mortar and pestles are still used heavily across Asia, both for cooking and medicinal purposes. The utensil adds a unique flavor to spices while also brings a traditional feel to the kitchen.
Ladle www.naturalhomebrands.com
15
Ladle
Ladles are similar to spoons but still very different from them. They have a long handle that culminates into an average-sized bowl. They're usually associated with liquid dishes like soups, sauces, and curries and are generally made from plastic or stainless steel. Serving with ladles is easy and safe as the long handle evenly distributes the force throughout the utensil.
Ramekin www.wayfair.com
16
Ramekin
Made from ceramic, plastic, or stainless steel, ramekins or soufflé dishes are small bakeware vessels used for baking. One filling of any dessert can be accommodated in the utensil, which is made as fire-resistant as possible. Sometimes they're even used for storing certain ingredients such as sugar, while also making adorable table dishes. Muffins, oven-sized eggs, and baked potatoes are some other dishes that can be made in ramekins.
Colander epicuriouskitchen.com
17
Colander
Rinsing is an integral part of cooking, and an efficient colander certainly helps. This kitchen tool is used to strain foods and rinse vegetables. They come in a lot of different shapes, some with long handles and others in a rectangular shape. They're lightweight and made from either aluminum or stainless steel. The main difference between a strainer and colander is the presence of larger holes in the latter.
Whisk www.crateandbarrel.com
18
Whisk
First invented in the 1800s and popularized by American chef Julia Child, whisks help blend and beat ingredients. They have a short handle and a longer-looped structure made from stainless steel or similar material. More number of wires in the whisk ensures much better blending as more air gets whipped. The idea of whisks stems from history, where twigs or small branches were used to beat food items.
Griddle www.williams-sonoma.com
19
Griddle
Capable of cooking a range of dishes, griddles are an absolute no-brainer for your kitchen. It consists of a broad, flat base that has a substantial heat source underneath. The idea of this device is just an expanded version of a traditional method, where brick slabs were used as the flat base. Electric griddles are also quite famous these days and can be used to cook a list of dishes.