Here's How Your Favorite Foods Came to be
26th June, 2020
Netflix unsplash.com
We love trying food from different places. So, let’s take a trip across the world and discover the culture and history of all our favorite dishes. Enjoy! Some of us are particularly in love with a specific cuisine, while some others like to dabble in dishes. But with all the international ruling of other continents and traveling the ancestors did, it’s difficult to predict the origins of these culinary favorites. If you think you’re a foodie of a high level, then you possibly already know the history of these favorite delicacies. Get reading and find out if you really know it all about food. You’re in for a delicious surprise!
Pho unsplash.com
01
Pho
This popular noodle soup has become the face of Vietnamese cuisine the world over. Pho was created during the French Colonial period. The demand for beef started rising during the time, and it soon became the locals’ staple breakfast. In the 30s, poet Tu Mo showed his resistance to colonialism by writing “An Ode to Pho,” symbolizing this combination of broth, rice noodles, and beef as a national treasure.
Buffalo Wings unsplash.com
02
Buffalo Wings
Do we even remember the time where buffalo wings weren’t part of the world? The inventor of this delicacy deserves our eternal gratitude for curing our late-night hunger pangs. Truth be told, the finger-staining, spicy, and crispy chicken dish isn’t that old. They were first made in 1964 at Buffalo, New York. No bar in the entirety of this country is complete without serving wings.
Guacamole www.freepik.com
03
Guacamole
Let’s talk about this chunky green creamy dip that pairs with chips like a match made in heaven. Guacamole is a Mexican gift we are all in love with. Strangely, there was a ban on its production and import, which was lifted only in 1997. It’s hard to see the Superbowl being watched by the country without the fans speedily devouring a bowl of guac?
Cheesecake www.freepik.com
04
Cheesecake
Despite being such a popular dessert in the US, Cheesecake finds its roots in ancient Greece. Athletes were served this dish in the first-ever Olympic games. Obviously, it wasn’t what we know and love today. The American version, on the other hand, dates back to the 1800s. We’re lucky to now have so many variations, and every one of them is amazing.
Fish & chips
05
Fish & chips
Ah, the classic plate of fish and chips! Golden brown soft fries served with a juicy fried fish has remained a staple of Brits through multiple decades. The existence of 25,000+ fish and chip shops in the UK is all the proof anyone needs. No wonder this greasy and delightful finger food remains their staple takeaway even in the 21st century.
Kimchi www.freepik.com
06
Kimchi
South-Korean cuisine is known for its large variety of side-dishes. Of them all, Kimchi is the most popular and is even the national dish of Korea. It can be found in every Korean household and can be made from various vegetables, of which Chinese cabbage is the most common. However, this 1500-year-old delicacy was initially made with radish since it was local produce.
Baklava www.freepik.com
07
Baklava
Its origin can be traced back to the Ottoman Empire. Synonymous with luxury, it was prepared only on special occasions since only the rich could afford it. Modern-day baklava has, however, been through a series of evolution. But there’s no denying that this rich multilayered stuffed dessert is worth all the hype it gets. No wonder so many ethnicities are claiming it as theirs.
Butter Chicken www.shutterstock.com
08
Butter Chicken
One of the most famous curry dishes and a haven to all the lovers of Indian cuisine, butter chicken was invented in the culinary capital of the country. This super-rich dish consists of tender succulent chicken pieces in creamy cashew and tomato base. The mix of dollops of butter and the fine blend of aromatic spices is sure to leave you wanting for more.
Mozzarella Sticks www.freepik.com
09
Mozzarella Sticks
If you even need proof of the fact that bread and cheese work really well together, this is it. The delicious greasy cheesy pipe is a gift from Medieval France. The recipe first appeared in a handbook called the Le Ménagier de Paris in 1393. It is thanks to the writer of this handbook, that the whole world can enjoy the different forms of this well-loved fried sticks.
Falafel www.freepik.com
10
Falafel
Falafel is delicious balls made from fava beans and chickpeas. The deep-fried balls are often an accompaniment eaten with an equally tasty hummus. Conceptualized to replace meat during the period of Lent, the true origin of this middle eastern dish is debatable. Like all other middle eastern dishes, falafel is also fought over its nationality. Well, all these food fights aside, it definitely is Israel’s national dish.
Panna Cotta www.freepik.com
11
Panna Cotta
This creamy and rich dessert was originally prepared in Piedmont, Italy. The credit of this is owed to a Hungarian woman in the 1900s. This delightful sweet dish is a simple blend of milk, sugar, and cream. It can be paired with caramel, chocolate sauce, berries, or other fresh fruits and can be easily found on an Italian restaurant’s menu.
Doughnuts www.freepik.com
12
Doughnuts
These sweet, savory, and doughy rings of heaven were invented by the Dutch. They were first presented as fried cakes or oil cakes to the Americans. Centuries ago, they did not come with a hole in the middle. The modern-day doughnut is definitely an American invention. These dough-delights were also used to brighten up the grim times of soldiers during World Wars I and II.
Tacos www.freepik.com
13
Tacos
This delicacy hasn’t always been a major contributor to the American food scene. Tacos are said to have emerged from Mexican silver mines and are now a staple fast food. On average, people in the country consume more than 4.5 billion tacos a year! One of the most famous franchise chains “Taco Bell” was started in 1962 by Graham Bell, and we are forever grateful.
Fried Chicken www.freepik.com
14
Fried Chicken
Fried chicken finds its roots in the Scottish populace that immigrated to the Southern states. It is their continual practice of deep-frying chicken that introduced America to this scrumptious dish. How else would this crunchy, crispy, and juicy treat have been a part of so many special occasions across the country? For years, fried chicken was a signature dish of celebration.
Chocolate Chip Cookie www.freepik.com
15
Chocolate Chip Cookie
We all crib about things not going per plan, don’t we? But some accidents work out so well; take chocolate chip cookies for example. Back in the day, in Toll House Inn, Whitman, if things had worked out as planned, chef Ruth Graves Wakefield would not have invented soul-nourishing delight. The nutty-chocolaty no-fuss baby was originally called the “Toll House Crunch Cookie”.
Peanut Butter www.freepik.com
16
Peanut Butter
Ever wondered what would kids pack in their lunches to school or to the couch if not PB&J sandwiches? The horror! Time to thank Canadian chemist Marcellus Gilmore Edson or his invention. This gooey creamy-crunchy combination is a healthy and tasty protein source. This well-renowned nut butter neither has butter in it nor nuts. Yep, that’s right, peanuts are actually legumes.
Fajitas www.freepik.com
17
Fajitas
This dish gained popularity thanks to fast-food restaurants in the 1990s and soon turned into “what's hot” on “the foods we love” list. Fajitas are made of grilled or broiled meat strips in wheat tortillas with guac or salsa and served taco style. Presently, there are various recipes and customizations available for making fajitas, and we love each and every one of them.
Bagels www.freepik.com
18
Bagels
Bagels are non-fried distant cousins of doughnuts and are equally if not more dear to us. This delicacy was brought to the country by immigrants from Poland. It has endured years of experimentation and now has various different flavors attached to it. Right from the good old caramel colored half boiled-half baked bread to the recent rainbow-colored ones to satisfy your sweet tooth. We’re here for it all.
Cinnamon roll unsplash.com
19
Cinnamon roll
It seems to be an ever-present pastry in every bakery. A cinnamon roll oozes with melted icing and is sure to catch the attention of your taste buds every time. But when was the first cinnamon roll baked? October 4th marks the day that the first ever cinnamon roll was baked in Sweden. The date later came to be christened as the National Cinnamon Bun Day.
Mayonnaise www.freepik.com
20
Mayonnaise
The cousin of ketchup is believed to be of French origin. The original recipe involves whipping together egg yolks and olive oil. This method has been modified many times over the mayo widely consumed today has additional acidic ingredients like vinegar or lemon juice. This no-cook creamy sauce can be easily made by simply mixing together all the ingredients for a few minutes.
Bruschetta www.freepik.com
21
Bruschetta
Its recipe involves hearty amounts of easily available ingredients used as toppings on the slices of bread baked with some garlic and olive oil. Bruschetta is traditionally made out of stale bread and is believed to have been invented in Italy during the 15th century. Even across its country of origin, the ingredients of the dish vary from region to region. You can modify the recipe however you want.
Dumplings www.freepik.com
22
Dumplings
They’re believed to have originated in various ethnicities of their own accord. The oldest in existence will lead you in China’s direction. Known by different names in different regions, dumplings are made of wheat flour and are stuffed with vegetables and/ or meat of choice. The delicious fatty pockets of taste became so popular around the world that you can now find its presence in almost every cuisine.
Sandwich unsplash.com
23
Sandwich
Sandwiches, as we know them today, are named in honor of the creator of its idea, the 4th Earl of Sandwich, John Montagu. Although he didn’t prepare the dish, he certainly was specific about how he wanted it. People got curious and wanted what the Earl was feasting on. No doubt, the people loved it when the made it at home. And then the rest is history.
Mac & Cheese
24
Mac & Cheese
In 1770, a book authored by Elizabeth Raffald was the first to record the modern-day recipe to the classic dish. Ever since it was boxed and distributed, mac and cheese turned out to be a preferred staple of most kids. The introduction of mac and cheese to the kitchens is, however, unknown. But, let’s face it, there is no denying the love for it that spans across generations.
Waffles www.freepik.com
25
Waffles
The country didn’t know waffles existed until the 1962 World Fair in Seattle. Another couple of years before that, it reached New York and climbed the ladder of fame. This hard-looking, soft-textured breakfast staple has become just a source of getting more toppings into our bellies. It is so calorie-laden that the original Belgian recipe sits in a corner fearing its fate.