Best 4th of July Snapshots From the Archives
03rd July, 2020
Netflix Rd.com
The Fourth of July is synonymous with parades and splendid fireworks. But there is more to the day than just that, as seen in these 20 historic snapshots. The American Independence Day is celebrated on the day that all the thirteen colonies proclaimed themselves independent of Great Britain. The events leading to this date have witnessed the best and worst of humanity, and this day commemorates it all. Over time, it has become a major holiday wherein family and friends get together and focus on leisure activities and vibrant displays of patriotism. People in the past too celebrated Independence Day with lots of vigour and excitement. Below are 20 such snapshots stuck in time of a simpler, yet equally patriotic celebration.
The Declaration of Independence Medium.com
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The Declaration of Independence
Thomas Jefferson, one of the most impactful and eloquent leaders, crafted the original draft document of the Declaration of Independence within weeks. It was then ratified and on 4th July, 1776, the Congress formally adopted it for thirteen colonies. Major festivities followed this. Church bells were rung, concerts, bonfires, parades and the firing of cannons and muskets accompanied the first public readings of the Declaration of Independence!
The flag’s impact Collection.cooper
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The flag’s impact
The Continental Congress met for the second time on June 14, 1777 and passed the Flag Act. The flag of the United States has 13 alternating red and white stripes and 50 stars in white on a blue backdrop in a corner. There are many interpretations of the earliest ideas involving the flag’s design, but there is no documentation to prove a particular theory.
American soldiers celebrating Independence Day, 1918 Mentalfloss.com
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American soldiers celebrating Independence Day, 1918
This day is special for all Americans, but it is understandable that it is the dearest for the soldiers. George Washington led the army to victory during the American Revolutionary War, which was fought for nine years. What began as a mere protest against economic policies eventually led to a full-fledged freedom struggle. Its end clearly shows in the relaxed postures of these soldiers.
Boy Scouts waving the American flag, 1917 Thedailybeast.com
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Boy Scouts waving the American flag, 1917
This scene depicting the Boy Scouts rejoicing will fill your heart with sheer joy, and will surely put a wide smile on your face. This picture is powerful enough that you can feel the thumping of their boots on the streets, their loud and exhilarating cheers, and the wind in your hair, as they wave the American flag enthusiastically from left to right.
A slice of this pie please, 1974 Shorpy.com
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A slice of this pie please, 1974
The Fourth of July is one holiday that is celebrated in almost every American household. Pictured here is a farming family that resided in Delaware County, Iowa. Food is an intrinsic part of celebrations, and looking at this, we would like to have some homemade apple pie too! Nostalgia, love, and the American spirit, all in one beautiful image of a moment stuck in time.
Team cowgirls, 1941 Mishupage.livejournal.com
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Team cowgirls, 1941
This image was taken in Oklahoma, where young girls donning cowboy hats and shoes were at the Fort Smith competition. While their outfits give the period away, the smiles can still be found on the faces of young Americans today. The country’s citizens celebrate this historic day in their own way. Some don costumes, some take part in competitions, and some even indulge in a chicken fight.
Children enjoying ice-shaved treats, 1947 Christianesantiago.blogspot.com
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Children enjoying ice-shaved treats, 1947
This beautiful photograph, captured by J. Baylor Roberts, depicts children lined up for snowball, a shaved-ice treat in Big Sandy, Tennessee. A yesteryear delight that is still eaten with a great amount of gusto, it may just have been around during the Roman Empire too. Were you aware that ice-creams came much later? We certainly do not mind tasting those snowballs had they existed today.
Elizabeth Young and Lyda Roberti, 1932 Marieclaire.com
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Elizabeth Young and Lyda Roberti, 1932
Elizabeth Young was a Paramount player of the 1930s while Lyda Roberti, who came from German-Polish background, was a cafe singer in her childhood. The Fourth of July has always been celebrated with fireworks, as it was a morale booster for those still fighting the war. Held by these two yesteryear’s beauties, the tradition of fireworks continued and today they symbolize happiness and celebration.
Baby parade, 1955 Historybyzim.com
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Baby parade, 1955
This photograph has so much going for it, we wouldn’t know where to begin. It was taken at the baby parade in Lititz Springs Park, Pennsylvania. The youngsters were judged on their costumes as a part of Independence Day celebrations. Involving young children in celebrations like these incurred in them a sense of pride and nationalism from an early age.
Decorated streets, 1910 Mysanantonio.com
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Decorated streets, 1910
Pictured here is a photograph of a small American town where the Fourth of July celebrations were underway. The flags are hung over wires and one can see carriages passing through the muddy streets. People are scattered here and there, and might have been a parade that just passed by. Who would have guessed that more than a century later, this same street would still be looked at wondrously?
The two hundred pound American flag, 1917 Manchesterinklink.com
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The two hundred pound American flag, 1917
In Manchester, New Hampshire, a group of mill workers (standing below the flag) created this 50-by-95 foot huge American flag which weighed around two hundred pounds. You will be surprised to read that each star is about a yard in diameter! The flag making industry boomed with the sudden demand for them and the earlier tools of die and mallet gave way to motor-driven machines to meet the supply.
Winning spree, 1954 Rd.com
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Winning spree, 1954
Kay Geurkink from Baldwin shares her fond memories of the Independence Day parade. She thanks her mother’s sewing for which she and her sisters stole the show in 1954’s Fourth of July parade held in Hammond, Wisconsin. A queen, Uncle Sam, and a farmer gone fishing, it is an almost accurate reflection of the diverse hotpot modern America is, and will continue to be.
The Shriners, 1969 Rd.com
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The Shriners, 1969
The Shriners of the Syrian temple, as photographed here, is a fraternity based on principles of brotherly love, relief and truth. The organization fosters self-improvement services, quality services for its members, and aims to serve mankind through the resources of its great philanthropy. All these values are still alive and well today, and we couldn’t be more thankful for that.
A game of tug of war, 1900-16 Demokratisch-links.de
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A game of tug of war, 1900-16
This tug of war contest was held on the streets of Skagway, Alaska as a part of the independence day celebrations. Many states keep competitions and games on this day to build or rebuild a sense of community and togetherness. Even adults are encouraged to participate and cash prizes are kept for the winners. The bragging rights that one gets are pretty cool too!
Donning the flag, 1923 Patrickmclean.substack.com
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Donning the flag, 1923
The amount of patience exhibited by these young women photographed here from Crete, Nebraska, stuns us. They create quite a spectacular image in our opinion. Bernice Sanderson, who now resides in Los Angeles, was one of the ‘stripe girls’ (second from right) who decided to pay a stunning living tribute to the Old Glory. This one will be etched in our memories for quite some time!
The childlike love for firecrackers, 1906 Mentalfloss.com
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The childlike love for firecrackers, 1906
This is one of those pictures which will surely make you say “awww..” This most adorable picture dates back to more than a hundred years, but the innocence and wonder it depicts is something we’re quite familiar with. Styled in a popular costume from that era, this boy is ready to celebrate the Fourth of July, as are we now!
Liberty Bell coming through, 1915 Rd.com
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Liberty Bell coming through, 1915
Mollie Weldon shared this picture captured by her stepfather Harry Davidson, depicting the Liberty Bell when it was travelling from Ogden, Utah to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco. A walkway on the flatcar was built so people could come close enough to touch the bell. We’re sure all the people who got to touch it had some great stories to narrate at dinnertime on that day!
Belgium-origin Americans celebrating their adopted homes, 1915 Businessinsider.com
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Belgium-origin Americans celebrating their adopted homes, 1915
In America, the Caucasian natives of the former Southern Netherlands (now Belgium), first arrived in the 17th century. The majority of Belgium immigrants came later in the 19th and 20th centuries. In this photograph, they’re showing their love for their adopted country, which will soon become home to all the generations to come. We can’t stop feeling a little emotional over this one, don’t mind us.